MEET HOUSE OF CABELO'S FIRST GRADUATE SPOTLIGHT

Featuring our first Cabelo graduate from Foothill High School. We have decided to pick a graduate who has been with House of Cabelo since she was a baby! Meet Makena Densmore. We have had the pleasure of doing Makena’s hair since she was a little girl. We have also had the pleasure of styling her Mom and siblings throughout the years. Not only is she beautiful on the outside but just as beautiful on the inside and has brains to go with that beauty. Her family like all families, have had it’s share of trials and tribulations, which Makena wrote an essay on that landed her a scholarship to the University of Oregon! She now see’s Jacob for her hair here at the salon. We are lucky to have grown with her and see her turn into the beautiful woman she has become! Watch out world, Makena is coming for you! xoxo

Photographer: Pamela Jacobsen

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HERE IS MAKENA’S ESSAY:   “Growing up as the youngest of four children was an interesting experience. While I was subjected to many pranks, I was also privileged in having three role models that I could always turn to in times of need. While all of my siblings had something unique to offer, it was my relationship with my older brother Spencer that has been the most special. I’ve always felt closest to him despite our 10 year difference. We’ve always had a special bond that made me feel at home. I would do anything for my brother, and he would do the same for me. However, myself and my family’s relationship with my brother all changed when my mom received a phone call that would alter all our lives.  On that phone call, we discovered that my brother had been struggling with substance abuse. His addiction to painkillers had derailed his entire life. Once an academic superstar, Spencer’s grades in college had plummeted, as did his overall well being. Spencer had to drop out of school and go straight into an intensive rehab program for several months. Though I was only in fourth grade at the time, the memories from that call are etched in my memory forever. I still vividly recall the night my parents told me and my older sister the news, watching my mom shake as she broke the news.  As a young girl, I had a hard time grasping the disease of addiction and the impact it had on my family. What I knew for certain was that my brother was sick, my family was constantly stressed out, and the brother I once saw very regularly was thousands of miles away in rehab. My most formative years growing up were spent falling asleep not knowing if Spencer was alive and dreading phone calls from hospitals reporting that he overdosed. When Spencer was clean and sober, my family acted like a loving, cohesive unit. When he relapsed, the family crumbled under the pressure of keeping him alive and off the streets.  In the face of all of this pressure and volatility, I knew I had a responsibility to be a positive force for those around me. I learned at an early age that life is very fragile and can be taken away at any moment. This experience has taught me to hold my friends and family close, to set everything else aside for them in times of struggle, whether it be my soccer career, school projects or social events. I have become a trusted child, sibling and friend to those around me, and the impact I’ve had for those around me as a source of light and support. But in reflecting on those moments, I’ve realized that I’ve been sacrificing my own successes to ensure the success of people around me.  As I look to this next chapter of my life, I realize I have an opportunity to expand my role as a positive force - not just for my friends and family, but for the first time in my life, myself. Prior to his addiction, my brother would have given anything to ensure that I was successful in life. Today, as I approach my first step in becoming an adult, I realize that I need to share that mindset. If I am fortunate enough be admitted I will be in an environment where I can focus on my own development. Through the many hard lessons I’ve learned through my brother’s struggles with addiction and growth as an individual, I am confident that I will find that success in the years to come. I will be part of something larger than I’ve ever been part of before, and will be able to impact my community on a larger scale while also developing a strong appreciation for my own life and those around me.”

HERE IS MAKENA’S ESSAY:

“Growing up as the youngest of four children was an interesting experience. While I was subjected to many pranks, I was also privileged in having three role models that I could always turn to in times of need. While all of my siblings had something unique to offer, it was my relationship with my older brother Spencer that has been the most special. I’ve always felt closest to him despite our 10 year difference. We’ve always had a special bond that made me feel at home. I would do anything for my brother, and he would do the same for me. However, myself and my family’s relationship with my brother all changed when my mom received a phone call that would alter all our lives.

On that phone call, we discovered that my brother had been struggling with substance abuse. His addiction to painkillers had derailed his entire life. Once an academic superstar, Spencer’s grades in college had plummeted, as did his overall well being. Spencer had to drop out of school and go straight into an intensive rehab program for several months. Though I was only in fourth grade at the time, the memories from that call are etched in my memory forever. I still vividly recall the night my parents told me and my older sister the news, watching my mom shake as she broke the news.

As a young girl, I had a hard time grasping the disease of addiction and the impact it had on my family. What I knew for certain was that my brother was sick, my family was constantly stressed out, and the brother I once saw very regularly was thousands of miles away in rehab. My most formative years growing up were spent falling asleep not knowing if Spencer was alive and dreading phone calls from hospitals reporting that he overdosed. When Spencer was clean and sober, my family acted like a loving, cohesive unit. When he relapsed, the family crumbled under the pressure of keeping him alive and off the streets.

In the face of all of this pressure and volatility, I knew I had a responsibility to be a positive force for those around me. I learned at an early age that life is very fragile and can be taken away at any moment. This experience has taught me to hold my friends and family close, to set everything else aside for them in times of struggle, whether it be my soccer career, school projects or social events. I have become a trusted child, sibling and friend to those around me, and the impact I’ve had for those around me as a source of light and support. But in reflecting on those moments, I’ve realized that I’ve been sacrificing my own successes to ensure the success of people around me.

As I look to this next chapter of my life, I realize I have an opportunity to expand my role as a positive force - not just for my friends and family, but for the first time in my life, myself. Prior to his addiction, my brother would have given anything to ensure that I was successful in life. Today, as I approach my first step in becoming an adult, I realize that I need to share that mindset. If I am fortunate enough be admitted I will be in an environment where I can focus on my own development. Through the many hard lessons I’ve learned through my brother’s struggles with addiction and growth as an individual, I am confident that I will find that success in the years to come. I will be part of something larger than I’ve ever been part of before, and will be able to impact my community on a larger scale while also developing a strong appreciation for my own life and those around me.”

Makena Densmore
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CUTS FOR A CURE

Meet Christopher, a gregarious friend, a supportive brother and loving son. His smile is contagious that lights up a room and is one of the most positive people we know. He enjoys the outdoors, yoga, walking, swimming and laughing every chance he gets. 

Christopher's journey began one and a half months before his diagnosis when he started experiencing strange symptoms: flu's, fever's, night sweat's, neuropathy (tingly feeling in his hands and feet), numbness in his jaw, joint pain in his arm and knees, molar pain and moving chest pain that started on the right side of his chest to the left side over the course of 1 week. He had seen a couple of doctors where each and every one of them offered the same diagnosis, that it was just the flu. 

Weeks after receiving his blood test results he was urged by a close friend to see a doctor do to a result that was overlooked (an elevated white blood count level of 47,000). Three hours after checking into the Emergency Room he was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia also known as (ALL) Philadelphia Chromosome Positive on February 19, 2016 at the age of 32. February 19 was exactly one month before he and his partner were going to exchange their vows in Puerto Rico. After eight long rounds of aggressive Hyper-CVAD chemotherapy, he was in complete medical remission. Soon after getting the news he was in full medical remission he thought his cancer journey had ended, until he was urged to get a bone marrow consultation by a handful of doctors. 

 

It was until the bone marrow consultation, where he was told he needed a transplant because it would be tricky to treat the Philadelphia Chromosome Positive while on chemotherapy maintenance for the next few years. Three months after the bone marrow consultation he was told he matched with 1 person out of 25 Million bone marrow volunteers in the international marrow donor registry. The volunteer matched him 10/10, which is rare for a minority/Hispanic in the registry. The news was life changing. Two months after receiving the news, he was given a transplant date: Friday, March 17, which begins a new chapter in his journey. 

Please join us on Sunday, April 2 from 10am - 4pm at House Of Cabelo for a Cut-A-Thon! House Of Cabelo will be offering dry cuts, beard trims and braids for a suggested donation of $35. The event is benefiting the RiosStrongFoundation and the Leukemia Lymphoma Society. House Of Cabelo will also be hosting a bone marrow drive to save others who are trying to survive this terrible disease. Hope you all can make it!

SUMMER HAIR CARE

SUMMER IS HERE.

Prevent sun damage to your hair now that things are really heating up! We are all aware that the sun causes harm to our skin and that spf (sun protectant factor) is a must but what about your hair? Your hair is at risk of fading color, split ends, becoming dry/ brittle and losing shine and bounce. This is all caused by prolonged exposure to the sun breaking down the hairs protein (keratin). Those uva and uvb rays have the power to damage the cuticle (outside layer of a single hair strand) to inner structure of the hair. Ultra violet rays can also break down the chemical bonds found in the makeup of color causing fading.


Here are some helpful ways to be sure your hair looks great, feels great and stays healthy while enjoying the outdoors…

  1. Prior to going into direct sunlight spray your hair with a leave in conditioner.
  2. Prior to enjoying a day at the pool wet your hair with a non chlorinated water. Your hair will soak up healthy moisture rather than the chlorine drying it out. 
  3. Allow your hair to air dry once in a while. Using those hot tools along with the dry weather will help assist in the damage. 
  4. Be sure to keep up with your haircuts.
  5.  Accessorize with hats and hair wraps.
  6. Switch your shampoo and conditioner appropriate to the season.
  7. Visit your stylist for professional treatments every few weeks.
  8. Consult with your stylist for the products that best suit your level of dryness. 
  9. Always keep a deep conditioner in your shower and use it once a week. 
  10. Drink water! Stay hydrated!